SOIL TO CITY

Mealtime is a time to relax and enjoy the culinary bounty of our region. Roost provides a welcoming, friendly and unobtrusive environment where you’ll feel a sense of community. Side by side we nestle together and experience how it feels to share a space, to share a city, to share a world. We savor how good food can taste when it’s a part of our community.

Our menu features local, organic, and seasonal foods of the highest quality. Talented Chefs design and create menu items and present them with skill and confidence in our show kitchen. The menu is priced to fit every budget and every occasion.

A community Harvest table located directly in front of the exhibition kitchen features a distinguished tasting menu promoting lively conversations among guests. Guests can sit at the counter and interact with the chefs as their food is being prepared. Recipe cards will be provided to guests after dinner to inspire the chef in all of us.

Our Sunday Brunch features some traditional favorites and exciting culinary innovations. The blood orange mimosas and hand crafted Bloody Marys will surely leave a smile on your face.

Click here for our menu >>

HARVEST TABLE LUNCH BUFFET

Come see us for unlimited soup, salad and flatbread at our Harvest Table Lunch Buffet for only $9.99. The best choice in downtown Greenville for a healthy and quick lunch!

Our Harvest table experience is the first of its kind in dining in downtown Greenville. It is a focal point of our dining room that allows you to build your own dining experience from the bounty of the Upstate.

The daily breakfast table represents our approach of “fresh for you food”. Gone are the days of rubber buffet eggs in chafers and stale breakfast breads. Instead, experience creations featuring eggs and produce from local farms together with flavorful artisan breads.  Click here menu »

Local Producers

Local food, sustainable food, or the local food movement is an alternative to big agribusiness, focusing instead on stimulating and supporting local producers and economies. The practice of offering and consuming local food is appealing because it eliminates the involvement of manufacturing, processing, and mass distribution, and instead allows both the producer and the consumer to focus on the quality of the product. The USDA’s definition of local food refers to products that can be considered day goods distance (DGD), generally under 400 miles from producer to consumer.

  • Ground Pork, Pork Jowl, Chicken Wings, Chicken Liver (Greenbriar Farms, Easley, SC)
  • Goat Cheese (Spilt Creek farm, Anderson, SC)
  • Eggs, Bologna, Bratwurst (Native Meats, Woodruff, SC)
  • Bistro Filet, Round Iron, Ground Beef, Pork Loin, Pork Belly, Chuck (Cox Farms, Near Florence, AL)
  • Cheddar, Blue Cheese (Ashe County, West Jefferson, NC)
  • Corn Meal, Grits (Adluh Mills, Columbia, SC)
  • Flour (White Lilly, Memphis, TN)
  • Country Ham (Benton’s, Madisonville, TN)
  • Kale, Collard Greens (Walter P Rawl Farms, Pelion, SC)
  • Honey (St Dominik’s Honey, Mayodan, NC)
  • Whole Milk, Butter (Happy Cow Creamery, Pelzer, SC)
  • Breads (Masada Bakery, Atlanta, GA)
  • Hot Momma, Butterscotch Moonshine, Green Villan Absinth (Dark Corner Distillery, Greenville, SC)
  • Green Tomatoes (Patterson Farms, China Grove, NC)
  • Salami (San Guiseppe Salami Company, Greensboro, NC)
  • Bib Lettuce (Sunny Creek Farms, Tryon, NC)
  • Mayo (Dukes Mayo, Greenville, SC)
  • Duck (Ashley Farms, Winston Salem, NC)
  • Chicken Thighs (Joyce Foods, Winston Salem, NC)
  • Pasta (Rio Bertolini’s, Charleston, SC)
  • Micro Greens (Tega Hills Farm, Fort Mill, SC)
  • Thomasville Tomme Cheese (Sweetgrass Dairy, Thomasville, GA)